Gallery: Vidi
Onion
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Island Journey Series

It is the predominance of black-ad white prints that ultimately provides a Hispanic flavor - that and the unease that envelopes the show as a whole but is concentrated in its most beautiful pictures...
Again in black and white are the studies of bulbs, tubers and other vegetables taken by Mr. Gimpaya. Initially, the pictures, earnestly titled twice, as in 'Patata/Potato' appear contrived to the point of perversity. Mr. Gimpaya explains his subjects with direct light only to render them ambiguous with reflected light and fuzzy or overly dark shadows as well as by placing that defies gravity. Nothing is right in these mysterious pictures yet everything is perfect, not least the surface on which the vegetables repose. This looks a lot like human skin and hence, implies the possibility of a torso underneath.

Vivien Raynor
The New York Times

Island Journey Series

Ten contemporary Puerto Rican photographers break stereotypes and stylistic boundries in this smart, satisfying show...Standouts:...Frank Gimpaya's hauntingly shadowed still lifes of fruits and vegetables that appear to be resting on skin...

Kim Levin
The Village Voice

The time has come, the Walrus said, to talk of many things...

Lewis Carroll
Alice in Wonderland